Saturday, January 14, 2017

First Science-Art Project in Jan 2017: Speculative Theory and Fiction in Interference Experiments

Hello all,
In conjunction with the Conference of 90 years of QM to be held in Singapore Jan 23-26, I have been invited by the organisers to share my work in a poster (despite not being a physicist, and not that physicist who works specifically in the foundations of quantum physics/quantum information etc). Here is the abstract below. The digital version of the poster will be posted up after the conference, for those who are interested to view it but cannot make the poster session. If anyone has interest in forming future collaboration for any part of the proposed project, do hit me up.

cheers
Clarissa

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This poster discusses a project that deploys well known examples from thought and actual experiments involving the interference phenomenon (and the concept of dualism as represented by the phenomenon) in quantum physics to produce fictional equivalents for speculative exploration and experimentation. The objectives of the project include enhancement to existing forms of physics instruction, scientific method for envisioning novel and unprecedented possibilities through the simulation of fictitious scenarios, and communication of speculative and more established scientific ideas. The proposed presentation is part of the umbrella of speculative theory/physics; science as fiction is advanced as a scenario simulator for experimenting with foundational concepts in quantum physics while imagining technological possibilities that could emerge in the longer term. The project also aims to produce a platform whereby novice physics (and non-physics major students who are curious) could acquire a more intuitive feel of quantum physics (and its formalism) by encouraging less inhibited exploration. The project is part of a science-art work that seeks to use art/fiction as scientific method for working with rigorous scientific concepts, with also potential for deployment in the history and philosophy of physics.